Mega Man X ‘Spark Mandrill’ For Orchestra

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biancarocksout:

#boys & #coffee 📷 @lordaleb (at Hungry Ghost at S Oxford)

B.Y.O.S. shirt = Bring Your Own Symphony?

biancarocksout:

#boys & #coffee 📷 @lordaleb (at Hungry Ghost at S Oxford)

B.Y.O.S. shirt = Bring Your Own Symphony?

asker

Anonymous asked: At the panel at Comic Con, George R.R Martin said "The show is the show and the books are the books," regarding fans who read the books that were upset of add or missing events/characters.

kenyatta:

fandomisreality:

kenyatta:

agameofclothes:

yes… but I can still be upset.

I’ve been thinking about all of the reasons we get upset when “the movie/show/musical/album” isn’t like the book.

  • Authenticity/Truthfulness (“That isn’t the way it happened in the book”)
  • Incongruence of experience with other fans (“We’re not talking about the same thing.”)

Anything else?

I think it’s also that people picture certain scenes and are really enthusiastic about certain scenes, characters, relationships, etc—enthusiastic about the way they were first portrayed in the book. And naturally, they want to see them portrayed that way on screen.

Enthusiastic + emotional response. Good catch that my robot heart did not compute.

Anchoring off “matching the scene”… maybe it’s more about how images created by descriptions are subjective from person-to-person.

So the shade of someone’s green shirt, size of someone’s nose, or length of someone’s hair contrasts from what each unique audience member imagined for themselves while reading the book.

So maybe it’s not about how “the movie wasn’t like the book”. Maybe it’s more about how the movie wasn’t like our book”.

I aged my guitar 60 years with an app

I aged my guitar 60 years with an app

Thoughts On Mega Man X ‘Spark Mandrill’ For Orchestra

"Wow, I can feel you chanting ‘No More Boss’ in every measure"

That’s what my friend said when he heard this week’s song, and that’s what I felt as I wrote every measure.

It’s quite fitting that Spark Mandrill is this week’s song for you because I feel like I finally overcame my own final boss this week. I’m moving to Los Angeles tomorrow and setting off for new beginnings.

With new beginnings comes happiness, which is really the only thing I’m after. I just want to be around the sun, go outside, collaborate with friends, and be along the Coastline. The East Coast stopped being fun for me. The pickup basketball teams got smaller, my friends are all married and usually unavailable, and my music has been uninspiring as a result recently.

As you know, I’ve been lost. I’ve been spending lots of time on building my robots, learning photography, and just searching for an answer in life. Not that that answer is Los Angeles, but at least hitting the “reset” button may lead to new ideas and motivation.

Spark Mandrill was a bigger, deadlier weapon, and stronger opponent than Mega Man X in almost every way. But what he didn’t have was Mega Man’s burning desire to save the Earth alongside the Maverick Hunters and Zero.

I feel that when push comes to shove, the size of the fight in the dog will always be more powerful than the size of the dog in the fight. Spark Mandrill learned that lesson, one that I hope to take with me on my new beginning.

The orchestra is the greatest ensemble in the world, and I can’t wait to share that captured emotion with you… tomorrow.

How could one ever forget the great blogging era of 1940?

How could one ever forget the great blogging era of 1940?

This isn’t a blog post about how autotune is ruining music (it’s not). It’s a post about how much higher the bar is, and how that bar is not human.

Above is Ricky Martin’s amazing Grammy performance from 1999. If you read the video comments you’ll notice some people feel that it’s horrible when compared to today’s performances.

And in some ways, it is. It’s not in 4K, 60 frames per second, autotuned, bright clothes, choreographed with 200 dancers, or uses every strobe light imaginable.

But back then, when I watched it as a 15 year old, it was the best. It was just so authentic and human. 

And once again, the bar is raised incredibly high on Youtube when compared to the Youtube of 2007.

In the ultra hi-speed race that we’re all entering, let’s not forget that we’re all bad artists and singers, even the best ones. In fact, bad singing and playing is what makes us sound human. Perfection is actually the uncanny valley.

What I don’t want is to go to another indie concert and overhear someone say the singer was horrible. The singer was amazing - it’s your bar that was unrealistic. Meanwhile, that Youtube video or live performance you watched was all smoke and mirrors re-edited 100 times until every note was perfect.

Which is perfectly fine for the entertaining factor, but completely loses the emotion we’re all yearning for in the first place…

to be human.